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Earth Hour

Today, (March 28th) at 8:30 p.m. local time, individuals, businesses, cities and landmarks around the world will switch off their lights for one hour to focus attention on climate change. As the lights go out, Earth Hour supporters will be contributing real time climate solutions to combat the globe’s biggest environmental challenge.

This year, Earth Hour is set to be a record-breaking celebration of our planet with an unprecedented 172 countries and territories having confirmed their participation, including nations on the climate frontlines like the Philippines, the Maldives and Madagascar, as well as key climate actors such as Brazil, the United States and China.

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Since its origin as a symbolic lights off event in Sydney in 2007, WWF’s Earth Hour has grown into the world’s largest grassroots movement for the environment, igniting public awareness and action on climate in more than 7,000 cities across the world.

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From Cambodia to Cameroon to Colombia, homes, offices, skylines and monuments will go dark as the world unites to inspire collective action to change climate change. Over 1,200 landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower in Paris and the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco will turn off their lights. Close to 40 UNESCO World Heritage Sites including the Acropolis in Athens and Edinburgh Castle in Scotland are also scheduled to go dark in support of Earth Hour.

As landmarks flip their switches off, WWF and Earth Hour teams will switch on the power of the crowd to address local climate issues. By empowering people to take concrete actions for climate — be it by raising their voice for stronger climate action or donating to WWF conservation projects — Earth Hour will bring people together to ensure the momentum to change climate change continues well beyond the hour.

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Even before Earth Hour sweeps across twenty-four time zones today, WWF teams are already using the power of the movement to drive concrete action and solutions on climate change. From collecting 100,000 signatures to urge a ban on the exploration of Arctic oil in Russia to reducing people’s dependency on firewood and forests in Uganda, the WWF is empowering people to be a part of a global movement to take climate action.

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Lights around the world will go out for one hour today, but the need to take climate action extends throughout the year. As Earth Hour brings temporary darkness to many of the world’s most recognizable landmarks, WWF hopes to shed permanent light on the power each individual has to change climate change.

Earth Hour 2015 will take place today, Saturday, March 28, at 8:30 p.m. local time.

Visit the Earth Hour Tracker: http://ehour.me/EHtracker​ to see events happening near you or to create your own Earth Hour activity.